Warning: increased White Shark activity along False Bay coastline

 The NSRI warns bathers, surfers and paddlers along the False Bay coastline  or those near Southern White whales  to be  careful because of increased shark activity.

Shark researchers  have noticed an annual trend of increased White Shark activity that has moved away from Seal Island and moved inshore along the coastline.

 Shark research shows a trend in White Sharks disappearing from Seal Island after seasonal CapeFur Seal hunting in August. The sharks then move close in-shore along the False Bay Coast especially between Macassar and Fish Hoek in search of natural food (Summer Fish, Sharks and Rays).

 Surfers at the popular surfing spots of Nine Miles and Cemetary and bathers between Strandfontein and Macassar are currently most prone to be in an area with the highest density of White shark although the advisory of caution stretches along the entire False Bay shoreline. 

Researchers also warn of increased White Shark activity around Southern Right Whales as the sharks are possibly hunting whale calves after birth or still born calves.  Also researchers advise against surfing or swimming where Slide Bait fishermen slide large baits into the surf to catch sharks as this form of fishing is believed to attract an increased number of sharks.

NSRI says bathers along the popular bathing and surfing beaches between Muizenberg and Fish Hoek should adhere to the shark spotters sirens and leave the water when the sirens are activated.

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